Med Dimensions Garners “Pet Start Up of the Year” Award In 2022 Pet Independent Innovation Awards Program

Annual Awards Program Recognizes Top Companies, Services and Products Within the Global Pet Industry

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Angular Limb Deformities with Med Dimensions 3D Printed Surgical Guides

From Dr. Andrew Jackson

Honey is a 1 year old female spayed Beagle mixed breed dog presented with a right forelimb angular limb deformity. Her deformity was quite pronounced compared to the left forelimb, which had mild typical valgus deformity. Radiographs revealed a biapical deformity of the right forelimb.

I contacted Med Dimensions and presented this case and inquired about what type of support that they could provide. Although I have performed numerous angular limb corrections, the world of 3D printing and guides is new. We discussed the plan of printing both models, osteotomy guides and reduction guides based on CT. Everyone was very helpful in explaining the process and we had no problems getting the imaging to the team. We had a preplanning meeting with 3D rendering of the proposed correction. It was very reassuring to know that everyone was on the same page as far as general osteotomies and angles of osteotomies. Further 3D rending of the osteotomy guides and reduction guides helped to further visualize the surgery and the use of the printed guides.

Prior to surgery I received the guides and models in a very manageable time frame. Med Dimensions has a very quick turn-around from image capture to actual guides and models. We completed a mock surgery with mock guides. This allowed plate contouring prior to the actual surgery. The ultimate benefit to using the guides is reduction in the time operating and the decrease in stress. The guide, once in place, provided a nice template for an accurate cut. There tended to be a bit less consternation than there usually is when performing osteotomies.

Once the osteotomies were completed the reduction guide, which is my favorite guide, helps with reduction, obviously, but enables fine-tuning of the plate placement and osteotomy reduction. This is a real time saver and stress reducer!

Lastly, working with the Med Dimensions team was wonderful. Correspondence was quick, easy and punctual. The models were of excellent quality and the guides were also of excellent quality. I will definitely be working with the team again and would definitely recommend this team to any other surgeon. I think that angular limb deformity surgery and planning are things that require a lot of experience and that is important, but this process could help to lower the learning curve and definitely the time in surgery.

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Feautured: Innovative Minds in Veterinary Medicine- Johnny Uday

An interview with Dr. Johnny Uday, a leading mind in innovative 3D medicine.

1) When did you know you wanted to get into veterinary medicine and helping animals?

When I was a kid, we took our sick pet to the vet. I was so happy that my little dog was going to get help, and I thought to myself, I want to do this when I grow up too.

2) You’ve worked in both human and veterinary medicine. How does your work translate between these two fields?

As veterinarians, we have to study many different species, from shrimps to rhinos, and humans are just another type of mammal really, so diving deeper into our species is complementary and fascinating at the same time for me.

Having said that, the interaction between veterinary medicine and human medicine is of paramount importance, given that many devices and medical tools are tested on animals before achieving approval for human use.

And when these procedures, techniques, devices etc. are perfected on humans, we can find ways to bring them back to the animal area, where the original product and solution started.

That is why veterinary medicine and human medicine go hand in hand.

3) How does it feel when you see a cutting guide or implant that you designed being used successfully?

It’s a dream come true. I thought it would be so amazing to see something I designed helping to improve lives, and luckily now I have seen that many times, and every single time it makes me smile and feel that I have a purpose in my life.

4) What do you see as the future of veterinary medicine and 3D printing in your home country of Ecuador?

This technology has been a game changer, not just in my country but in the whole world. I’m confident it will become a paramount part of the medical field, and hopefully I will be part of that development with my work.

5) You do a lot of pro-bono work. Who are you helping and what drives you to continue to do this work?

Sadly, Covid hit hard around the world, especially in developing countries like Ecuador. My situation, luckily, is better than a lot of people around here, and I know I can help in many cases- no matter how big or small-, so when I can help, I do. 

Probably it is something related to ego too, when someone is grateful and praises you, however, as long as you are helping someone I believe that is a good thing.

6) How did you get where you are today?

Curiosity and obsession. I mean, I cannot say it felt like “hard” work- because I’m lucky, I really enjoy what I do. It feels more like a pleasure activity than work really.

7) What do you enjoy doing in your spare time? (if you have any!)

I’m a fairly decent dancer, (according to me).

I think physical activities are so important in life; I could spend hours and hours in front of a computer, but that is detrimental for your health.

My brain needs proper oxygenation for working at its top level, and dancing provides me that, and also encompasses creativity, fun, and exercise.

Follow Dr. Johnny Uday on LinkedIn here.

Follow Med Dimensions on LinkedIn here.

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Featured: Innovative Minds In Veterinary Medicine- Will Byron

A Sit Down Interview with Will Byron, Chief Technology Officer and Co-Founder at Med Dimensions.

1. What has inspired you to help animals?
From before I was even born, my parents had been doing animal rescue which meant I was born in a life full of, and fulfilled by, animals. It ranged from things as small as fish to as large as horses, and dozens of different types in-between. With parents both in the medical field, it meant we got the “broken pets” that people dumped or couldn’t care for medically. Watching these animals being nurtured back to health, and my parents doing the same for people, ingrained a desire to find ways to help those who can’t always help themselves.

2. You mentioned growing up with “broken pets” and watching them be nurtured back to health.What’s it like knowing your work and education has been to help animals?
To be frank, its fulfilling to know that I can still help pets while being involved in really high tech stuff. I always struggled to see how I could blend all my interests and still be in touch with my passion for animals. I thought I would need to go after a job would give me the financial means to do so, but now I get to help pets everyday AND its everything I, as a self proclaimed “enginerd”, love to do and tinker with.

3. When you see a surgical cutting guide that Med Dimensions made being used in a procedure, what is that feeling like?
I can’t really find the right word- beyond flabbergasted! The fact we can help pets through technology that is so new and just coming to light in human medicine, is beyond what I dreamed possible until a few years ago. On top of that, having spent those years hearing the stories, seeing the stress in the OR, and then hearing how these cutting guides really helped or even so far as “making the surgery possible”, leaves me feeling like I’m dreaming.

4. When did you discover your engineering experience would help you create products to assist vets and people’s pets?
A bit of backstory is necessary here; I came into undergrad dead set on making the next generation of prosthetics. I was convinced there was no other way, no other thing I ever wanted to do. I thought that was my new reality after I joined a human focused prosthesis lab working with our Co-Founder and CEO Sean Bellefueille. When that lab closed down, Sean and I decided that was not going to be the end of it, we spent a lot of time figuring out how to make this into a club. Through some of resources from that lab, and people like Jade Meyers from RIT, the club came to fruition and we were connected with some people and a pet or two in need. The details are muddy on how it all happened, but eventually the club was running more projects for pets in need than people. There was no single point in that process where I just knew, but eventually I decided I loved the pets part of the work and I think I could do this forever, because it seemed like pets were really overlooked. A few more years of doing that work, and a local veterinary surgeon reaching out to us for help on a angular limb deformity case then opened my eyes to the fact I could help pets by helping their vets! It really was that case that started a cascade of events that lead me to know I wanted to use my engineering skills to help pets and vets.

5. What motivates you to continue your work at Med Dimensions on a day-to-day basis?
I think the drive largely comes from the life long passion of helping pets, and trying to manifest that as a career, alongside my love for exploring new technologies or new ways to use it. When I take a step back to look at his from a 3rd person perspective, I’m doing something that satisfies a core value, I’m doing something I have loved my whole life and was a huge portion of that life growing up, and I’m getting to do this all in the realm of hobbies and technologies that I love exploring. How could you not feel motivated to get up in the morning, or stay up late in the evening for those of us who claim to be nocturnal, when you hit a trifecta like that? I really can’t envision something more perfect for me to be doing with my life. So the shorter version; because I love what I’m doing to my core.

6.What is your favorite pastime with pets?
Show me a a mountain to hike and a dog by my side, and I couldn’t be happier! Being outside is my escape, and an accompanying pets is the cherry on top. Somewhat ironic for the person saying they love high tech stuff, but there is something about the calm of nature, and the unspoken (quite literally) communications between pet and person that make the chaos of the world, the rings of messages, and the hubbub of life a distant worry for a short time.

Follow Will Byron on LinkedIn here.

Follow Med Dimensions on LinkedIn Here.

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Long Island Spine

A Case Study in Pre-Surgical Planning

One of the largest applications of 3D modeling and design in medicine is pre-surgical planning.

In early December 2021, Dr. Laurence Mermelstein at Long Island Spine Specialists in New York contacted Med Dimensions about a complex spine case.

A new patient presented with severe pain and limited mobility in his low back. He previously had been through two spine procedures and a hip procedure that had not solved his issues. In the second back surgery, the doctors removed old hardware and attempted a spinal fusion, but it failed over time, as the fused levels sheared and shifted the vertebral body both anteriorly and laterally, causing spinal rotation.  Somehow, this patient was still substantially mobile.

Somehow, this patient was still walking into his office!

X-Rays showed the patient’s deformities in two dimensional images- but with multiple deformities collocated, it was impossible to see the full extent of the deformation.

Dr. Mermelstein approached Med Dimensions to turn his two dimensional challenge into a three dimensional solution.

“I was able to plan reduction maneuvers for this patient, as the vertebral body had been shifted and there was an element of rotation. This twisted anatomy was challenging, and the model being accurate helped me plan how to piece it together.”

Dr. Laurence Mermelstein, Long Island Spine Specialists

We were able to take this patient’s images and turn them into an accurate model for Dr. Mermelstein that replicated precisely what he would encounter in the operating room. Collaborating with our partner Vent Creativity, Med Dimensions printed a 3D model that looks, feels, and moves like real bone. The surgeon was able to minimize the unknowns he had prior to the surgery.

With this model, he was able to determine that a posterior surgical approach was ideal, and further that a lateral/anterior approach for operation would potentially be harmful to the patient. (Below are post operative x-rays)

Flash forward to today, this patient is up, moving, and doing well! Pre-operative models for planning and practice are becoming the new standard for patient care, and Med Dimensions is on the forefront of this technology.

Contact us to prepare for your next case!

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VENT Creativity and Med-Dimensions Announce Development Partnership For AI Based Canine Hip Replacement Surgery Planning System from DICOM Images

VENT Creativity Corporation., a leading provider of Principal Density Analysis software applications for medical imaging modalities, and Med-Dimensions, LLC., a veterinary medical device company specialising in patient-specific education and surgical solutions, today announced the availability of an integration between the two development environments to streamline the imaging to custom 3D printed cutting guides for canine hip replacement surgeries at an unparalleled speed and cost.

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Rendering of a femur with custom cutting guide from Vent Creativity/Med Dimensions.

The direct connection between VENT Creativity’s 3D CAD based density analysis AI software, Minerva, and Med Dimension’s biocompatible 3D printed cutting guide technology allows companies or hospitals to quickly optimize product designs through rapid design and simulation cycles with minimal cost to the surgeon customers.

Digital simulation software is growing in healthcare as more surgeons analyze surgical plans and cutting guides for the surgeries they plan. This trend toward patient specific and fast analysis – where digital simulation occurs as part of the surgical process – benefits surgeons and patients by providing patient specific optimal quality, reduced OR time with guides that fit the patient anatomy everytime, and reduced guess work for in surgery decision making.

For the healthcare system where time and costs are decision drivers for products used, moving from manual tools that do not always fit the patients to custom delivered guides that fit each patient everytime is a value driver. The integration between VENT Creativity and Med Dimensions allows the easy exchange of information so design and simulation run in parallel.

Dr Rory Todhunter on the value added to the medical community from this partnership:

“The goal of elective surgery is to improve quality of life for the patient while reducing the risk of surgical error. Training, practice, and experience reduce the risk of error. However, if freehand implantation of a femoral stem in a total hip replacement procedure is not coaxially aligned, femoral fracture can result. A 3D printed reaming guide to develop coaxially aligned preparation of the femoral canal that can be produced quickly and cost effectively from a CT will reduce surgical error and complications for surgeons of differing experience. The risk of surgical error and operative time should be reduced.”

For more information on the technology offered by the collaboration, please visit:

Ventcreativity.com Med-Dimensions.com

Or email us direct at info@ventcreativity.cominfo@med-dimensions.com

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M3Dimensions shifts from 3D modeling to face shields

From Kevin Oklobzija of the Rochester Business journal, 3/24/2020

In normal times, M3Dimensions would be bettering the surgical process for veterinarians and providing veterinary students with 3D models to enhance learning.

But during this global coronavirus pandemic, the Rochester-based medical device company is instead creating lightweight, protective face shields for health care workers.

M3Dimensions, a startup launched by a group of former and current Rochester Institute of Technology students, has been in contact with medical professionals on Long Island to design and produce a practical face shield.

“We’re trying to work with their protocols so there’s an airtight seal,” said Sean Bellefeuille, co-founder and CEO of the firm. “We have to make sure everything fits their needs.”

The goal is to supply health care workers with a tangible extra layer of protection, using the firm’s 3D printing process to create the top band that holds the shield. The shield uses a closed-cell foam cushion and polyethylene terephthalate plastic, which does not absorb moisture or harbor bacteria.

“With everything going on, a lot of people are trying to help,” Bellefeuille said. “But you don’t want something that isn’t safe and gives someone a false sense of security. This would be an extra barrier to block the virus.”

Based on printer inventory, Bellefeuille figures M3Dimensions can produce 40 to 60 shields a day. Other firms with Fused Deposition Modeling 3D printers can also produce the shields, he said. The M3Dimensions website provides more information.

M3Dimensions was founded in the summer of 2019, though the seven-person group has been working together on implementation of the business idea since 2018.

The company works to provide veterinarians a precise 3D model of a knee ailment or bone abnormality before surgery. The anatomical model is made from polylactic acid plastic and is created from an MRI or CT scan. The technology can also be used in the medical field.

By examining the model ahead of time, doctors can determine what exactly must be done in surgery to correct the existing medical issue. That reduces time in the operating room and time under anesthesia for the pet, said Michael Campbell, director of business development for M3Dimensions.

The firm has also provided veterinary schools with a batch of anatomical models so students can see, touch and feel what they would find in surgery.

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